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Result : Searchterm 'Gamma Ray' found in 1 term [] and 23 definitions []
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Gamma Ray
 
Gamma rays are a form of nuclear radiation that consists of photons emitted by radioactive elements from the nucleus. This high energetic light emission is also produced from subatomic particle interaction, such as electron positron annihilation. Gamma radiation, similar to x-radiation can injure and destroy tissue, especially cell nuclei.
Gamma rays have in general very high frequencies, short wavelengths, are electrically neutral and penetrate matter. The interaction of gamma rays with matter depends on the nature of the absorber as well as the energy of the gamma rays; these interactions determine also the type and amount of shielding needed for radiation protection.
See also Radiation Safety, Lead Equivalence, Lead Apron, Leaded Glove, Glove-Box, Radioactive Decay Law and Radiation Worker.
 
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Photon
 
A photon is a discrete packet of electromagnetic energy. The amount of energy depends on the frequency (wavelength) of the photon. Highest frequency, most energetic photon radiations are gamma rays, up to 300 EHz - 1.24 MeV. In addition to energy, photons are also carrying momentum.
Photons have no electrical charge or rest mass and exhibit both particle and wave behavior.
Photons are traveling in vacuum (without interactions with matter) with the constant velocity of 2.9979 x 108 m/s (c, speed of light).
Photons get absorbed or scattered away from their original direction of travel when interacting with matter.
High energy photons as for example x-rays cause damages to exposed tissue and cells. Radiation exposure is measured in roentgen, radiation absorption in Roentgen//min.
Photon radiation in the frequency ranges of x-rays and gamma rays are used for medical diagnostic and treatment.

See also Photon Energy and Gamma Ray.

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Electromagnetic radiationOpen this link in a new window
'Electromagnetic (EM) radiation is a self-propagating wave in space or through matter. EM radiation has an electric and magnetic ...'
by en.wikipedia.org    
PhotonOpen this link in a new window
'In physics, the photon is the elementary particle responsible for electromagnetic phenomena. It is the carrier of electromagnetic ...'
by en.wikipedia.org    
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Interactions of Photons with Matter(.pdf)Open this link in a new window
'Photons are electromagnetic radiation with zero mass, zero charge, and a velocity that is always c, the speed of light. Because ...'
by mightylib.mit.edu    
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Gamma Camera
 
(Scintillation Camera, Scintillation Gamma Camera, Gamma Scintillation Camera or Anger Gamma Camera) A gamma camera is an imaging device used in nuclear medicine to scan patients who have been injected, inhaled, or ingested with small amounts of radioactive materials emitting gamma rays. The gamma camera records the quantity and distribution of the radionuclide that is attracted to a specific organ or tissue of interest.
The first gamma camera was developed and introduced by Hal O. Anger in 1957/58. The structure hasn't changed by today. A gamma camera consists of:
point a collimator, usually a multihole collimator;
point detector crystals, typically thallium-activated NaI scintillation crystal are used;
point photomultiplier tube array
point shielding to minimize background radiation
point position logic circuits
point and the data analysis computer
Through this design the simultaneous registration of gamma ray photons is possible, the computer further allows dynamic imaging.
See also Pinhole, Elution, Center of Rotation, First Pass Scintigraphy, and Anger Hal Oscar.


  Further Reading:
  Basics:
Scintillation Camera with Multichannel Collimators - Hal 0. Anger(.pdf)Open this link in a new window
'The scintillation camera is a sensitive electronic instrument for taking pictures of the distribution of gamma-ray and ...'
by jnm.snmjournals.org    
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A Compact 16-Module Camera Using 64-Pixel CsI(Tl)/Si PIN Photodiode Imaging Module(.ppt)Open this link in a new window
by cfi.lbl.gov    
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Acute Radiation Syndrome
 
(ARS) The acute radiation syndrome is a form of radiation sickness. An acute radiation syndrome can be developed after the exposition to a high radiation dose received in a short period of time (e.g., x-rays or gamma rays). ARS subsyndromes include hematopoietic, cutaneous, gastrointestinal, and neurovascular diseases. The reaction will vary with dose and factors like age, medical co-morbitdity and immunosuppression.


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Acute Radiation Syndrome: A Fact Sheet for PhysiciansOpen this link in a new window
'Acute Radiation Syndrome (ARS) (sometimes known as radiation toxicity or radiation sickness) is an acute illness caused by ...'
by www.bt.cdc.gov    
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Annihilation
 
Annihilation in general refers to the transition of a particle and its antiparticle by collision into something different, depending on their energies and based on the conservation of energy and momentum. The electromagnetic radiation emitted is the result of the annihilation (combination and disappearance) of an electron and a positron. Two gamma rays of 0.511 MeV energy, assuming very low-energy particles, are emitted perpendicular to each other.


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AnnihilationOpen this link in a new window
'Annihilation is defined as "total destruction" or "complete obliteration" of an object;[1] having its root in the Latin nihil ...'
by en.wikipedia.org    
Electron-positron annihilationOpen this link in a new window
'Electron-positron annihilation occurs when an electron and a positron (the electron's anti-particle) collide. The result of the ...'
by en.wikipedia.org    
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