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Result : Searchterm 'Radiology Information System' found in 1 term [] and 4 definitions []
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Radiology Information System
 
(RIS) Radiology department computer software system to manage patient details, records, images, tracking and scheduling, etc.
 
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Radiology information systemOpen this link in a new window
'A radiology information system (RIS) is a computerized database used by radiology departments to store, manipulate and distribute ...'
by en.wikipedia.org    
Searchterm 'Radiology Information System' was also found in the following services: 
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Diagnostic Imaging
 
Imaging refers to the visual representation of an object. Today, diagnostic imaging uses radiology and other techniques, mostly noninvasive, to create pictures of the human body. Diagnostic radiography studies the anatomy and physiology to diagnose an array of medical conditions. The history of medical diagnostic imaging is in many ways the history of radiology. Many imaging techniques also have scientific and industrial applications. Diagnostic imaging in its widest sense is part of biological science and may include medical photography, microscopy and techniques which are not primarily designed to produce images (e.g., electroencephalography and magnetoencephalography).
Brief overview about important developments:
Imaging used for medical purposes, began after the discovery of x-rays by Konrad Roentgen 1896. The first fifty years of radiological imaging, pictures have been created by focusing x-rays on the examined body part and direct depiction onto a single piece of film inside a special cassette.
In the 1950s, first nuclear medicine studies showed the up-take of very low-level radioactive chemicals in organs, using special gamma cameras. This diagnostic imaging technology allows information of biologic processes in vivo. Today, single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) play an important role in both clinical research and diagnosis of biochemical and physiologic processes.
In the 1960s, the principals of sonar were applied to diagnostic imaging. Ultrasound has been imported into practically every area of medicine as an important diagnostic tool, and there are great opportunities for its further development. Looking into the future, the grand challenges include targeted contrast imaging, real-time 3D or 4D ultrasound, and molecular imaging. The earliest use of ultrasound contrast agents (USCA) was in 1968.
The introduction of computed tomography (CT/CAT) in the 1970s revolutionized medical imaging with cross sectional images of the human body and high contrast between different types of soft tissues. These developments were made possible by analog to digital converters and computers. First, spiral CT (also called helical), then multislice CT (or multi-detector row CT) technology expanded the clinical applications dramatically.
The first magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) devices were tested on clinical patients in 1980. With technological improvements including higher field strength, more open MRI magnets, faster gradient systems, and novel data-acquisition techniques, MRI is a real-time interactive imaging modality that provides both detailed structural and functional information of the body.

Today, imaging in medicine has been developed to a stage that was inconceivable a century ago, with growing modalities:
point x-ray projection imaging, including conventional radiography and digital radiography;
point angiography;
point fluoroscopy;
point computed tomography;
point sonography;
point magnetic resonance imaging;
point magnetic source imaging;
point scintigraphy;
point single photon emission computed tomography;
point positron emission tomography.

All these types of scans are an integral part of modern healthcare. Usually, a radiologist interprets the images. Most clinical studies are acquired by a radiographer or radiologic technologist. In filmless, digital radiology departments all images are acquired and stored on computers. Because of the rapid development of digital imaging modalities, the increasing need for an efficient management leads to the widening of radiology information systems (RIS) and archival of images in digital form in a picture archiving and communication system (PACS). In telemedicine, medical images of MRI scans, x-ray examinations, CT scans and ultrasound pictures are transmitted in real time.
See also Interventional Radiology, Image Quality and CT Scanner.

• View the NEWS results for 'Diagnostic Imaging' (13).Open this link in a new window. 


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Medical imagingOpen this link in a new window
'Medical imaging refers to the techniques and processes used to create images of the human body (or parts thereof) for clinical ...'
by en.wikipedia.org    
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Imsging TimelineOpen this link in a new window
'Efforts to capture visions beyond the range of the normal eye have long engaged scientists and engineers. By the mid-1880s George ...'
2003 by www.greatachievements.org    
Radiology Resources 
 pointSafety pool    pointDirectories    pointService and Repair    pointUniversities    pointContrast Enhanced CT    pointNeck    
 
Digital Imaging And Communications In Medicine
 
(DICOM) DICOM is the industry standard for transferral of radiologic images and other medical information between computers. Patterned after the Open System Interconnection of the International Standards Organization, DICOM enables digital communication between diagnostic and therapeutic equipment and systems from various manufacturers.
The DICOM 3.0 standard evolved from versions 1.0 (1985) and 2.0 (1988) of a standard developed by the American College of Radiology (ACR) and National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA). To support the implementation and demonstration of DICOM 3.0, the RSNA Electronic Communications Committee began to work with the ACR-NEMA MedPacs ad hoc section in 1992.
Also Picture Archiving and Communication Systems (PACS), which are connected with the Radiology Information System (RIS), use commonly the DICOM standard for the transfer and storage of medical images.
See also Barcode, Annotation, Printer and Diagnostic Imaging.


  Further Reading:
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DICOM HomepageOpen this link in a new window
by medical.nema.org    
Digital Imaging and Communications in MedicineOpen this link in a new window
by en.wikipedia.org    
The DICOM Medical Imaging StandardOpen this link in a new window
by www.leadtools.com    
Searchterm 'Radiology Information System' was also found in the following services: 
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Picture Archiving and Communication System
 
(PACS) Picture Archiving and Communication System is an IT-based storage and retrieval system for digital images.

See also Radiology Information System and Digital Imaging And Communications In Medicine.


  Further Reading:
  Basics:
Picture archiving and communication systemOpen this link in a new window
'In medical imaging, picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) are computers or networks dedicated to the storage, ...'
by en.wikipedia.org    
Searchterm 'Radiology Information System' was also found in the following services: 
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MRI  (3) Open this link in a new windowUltrasound  (4) Open this link in a new window
RIS
 
See Radiology Information System.

• View the NEWS results for 'RIS' (17).Open this link in a new window. 
Radiology Resources 
 pointBreast/Mammography    pointMolecular Imaging    pointContrast Agents    pointCT/Radiology Training Courses    pointArtifacts    pointRadiology    
 
Radiology Resources 
 pointAbdominal    pointThorax, Chest    pointCT/PET Scanners    pointImaging Center    pointService and Repair    pointEncyclopaedias    
 
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